Reptoman

see reptiles diffenetly

   Feb 05

Snake gait: Science observes nature to invent new ways of moving

By Herp News

Snake locomotion is a source of inspiration for technology: graceful, silent, adaptable and efficient, it can be implemented on devices designed for the most diverse applications, from space exploration to medicine. A new study adds to this line of research and proposes a detailed mathematical account of one of the characteristic types of movement adopted by this animal.

Go to Source

…read more
Read more here: herpetofauna.com


   Feb 05

Herp Photo of the Day: Rattlesnake Friday!

The photo may be a bit blurry, but there is no mistaking that is a gravid Masssasauga in our Herp Photo of the day, uploaded by kingsnake.com user LetsConservate24 in the field! We can only imagine the excitement at this find! Be sure to tell them you liked it here!

Upload your own reptile and amphibian photos photos at gallery.kingsnake.com, and you could see them featured here! …read more
Read more here: King Snake


   Feb 04

Bachelor’s paradise: Female turtles outnumbering males due to warming temps

By Herp News

Rising global temperatures may skew gender imbalance among the marine turtle population, according to new research. The sex of marine hatchlings is influenced by incubating temperatures, and warmer temperatures produce a higher number of female hatchlings.

Go to Source

…read more
Read more here: herpetofauna.com


   Feb 04

Herp Photo of the Day: Salamander

What a great field shot of this Black Salamander found in a redwood forest in our Herp Photo of the day, uploaded by kingsnake.com user sc_shark! Be sure to tell them you liked it here!

Upload your own reptile and amphibian photos photos at gallery.kingsnake.com, and you could see them featured here! …read more
Read more here: King Snake


   Feb 04

Marbled Newts


The green and black color of this beautiful newt blend well with the aquatic vegetation.
Newts, a subset of salamanders in the family Salamandridae, may be found in both the New and Old Worlds. The males of many of the Old World taxa develop nuptial finery (seasonally present and often exaggerated caudal, nuchal, and vertebral finnage) that, no matter the season, no New World species ever has.

And of these Old World salamandrid dandies, IMO one of the most beautiful is the black on forest green (more rarely the black may predominate) marbled newt, Triturus marmoratus, of Spain, Portugal, and France.

Black on green may sound flamboyant, and indeed it is when seen in a home terrarium or aquarium. But when at home in the dappled sunlight and submerged vegetation of a woodland pond, the color combination is a surprisingly effective camouflage.
Although high and very noticeable the even-edged black and green banded vertebral and caudal finnage of this large (it attains a stocky 4 ½ – 6”) newt is less ornate that that of several of its cousins. The nuptial fins of these latter are prettily scalloped. But what the marbled newt lacks in fin appearance is more than compensated for by beauty of color. And as just a bit of added splendor, when, following the breeding season the fins of the marbled newt are resorbed, they remain represented by an orange middorsal ridge. Can you say “pretty?”

Continue reading “Marbled Newts” …read more
Read more here: King Snake


   Feb 03

Herp Photo of the Day: Iguana

For a little excitement in your life, add a Ctenosaura pectinata to your home like the one in our Herp Photo of the day, uploaded by kingsnake.com user cochran ! Be sure to tell them you liked it here!

Upload your own reptile and amphibian photos photos at gallery.kingsnake.com, and you could see them featured here! …read more
Read more here: King Snake


   Feb 02

Frankie Tortoise Tails – Sherlock and the Case of the Red Foot Tortoise

The Internet story of the red foot tortoise found alive in a box 32 years after it disappeared is so amusing to me that I thought I would add a bit of logic to this….as in Sherlock Holmes logic.

Hold on to your shells. We are going to use some smarts.

The story of the turtle is a riddle that today may need a genius thinker to solve because, regretfully, a lot of people think that what they read on the internet is true. Um, let me just repeat that: a lot of people think everything on the internet is true.

A lot of Internet stories are written as enhanced reality, or something fixed up to be more interesting. But let’s let Sherlock look at the facts.

A family had a red foot tortoise. It “ran away” or “disappeared.” The turtle was not located nor re-appear for the rest of the time the children lived in the house. The children grow up and move out of the house. These are accepted as fact.

Other facts: Dad died. House was left to the children. House had a lot of stuff left inside. All accepted as fact.

Children clean out the house but there is no mention of any turtle husbandry equipment when they clean up the house. A neighbor makes mentions of the turtle in the trash the children toss from the house. A turtle is found mingling within boxes once inside the house.

Now, here is the jump to fiction. Child says turtle must be the one lost 32 years ago.

Sherlock would say, “Well, first, let’s look at all the facts.”

Sherlock would ask, “Where is your proof that this is the same turtle? Do you have pictures to compare it to? Did a veterinarian attest that this turtle is 32 years old? Can a herpetologist verify that this turtle is the same species you had before? Can either the veterinarian or the herpetologist verify that the turtle’s physical condition is that of a turtle that lived in a house unseen for 32 years without any care?

Sherlock would then say, “You are an idiot.”

Okay, Sherlock wouldn’t say the kid was an idiot. That was me saying the kid was an idiot. Sherlock would be kind and say, the turtle is not the same turtle you saw when you were a child thirty-two years ago.

“First, the children said they did not see the turtle anywhere in the house during the years they lived there with their father. Records kept on the longevity of the species Chelonoidis carbonaria ssp. estimate that they can live from 30 to 50 years, depending on scientific literature and amateur observation. It is also obvious that this family were but amateur keepers.”

“At this point,” Sherlock said, “I would turn the conversation to Julie Maguire at Long Island Turtle Rescue to attest to the condition of …read more
Read more here: Turtle Times


   Feb 02

Herp Photo of the Day: Hognose

How cute is this hognose in our Herp Photo of the day, uploaded by kingsnake.com user nearhoofm brighten your Monday! Be sure to tell them you liked it here!

Upload your own reptile and amphibian photos photos at gallery.kingsnake.com, and you could see them featured here! …read more
Read more here: King Snake


   Feb 02

Backyard Bronze Frogs


This is a gravid female bronze frog at the edge of out pool.
Plunk, plunk, plunk. Hmmmm. Where’d they come from?

The calls were obviously those of bronze frogs, Rana c. clamitans, the southern and nominate form of the more northerly green frog. Bronze or green, the calls are the same—plunks best likened to the sound made while tuning a loose banjo string. And these calls were coming from what I felt was an unlikely place…

During our many year drought, when no ephemeral pools contained water, Patti and I decided that the southern toads in our yard needed a breeding puddle. So we bought a 20 foot square of pliable PVC, dug a slope-sided excavation about 15” deep in the center, laid in the liner, filled it with water from the hose, and sprinkled dirt over all of the liner that remained exposed. IOW, our intended toad pool was simple in the extreme. We threw in a few aquarium plants, sat back and waited to see if the toads would accept the new water filled hole.

They did. First in small numbers but then from the chorus it seemed that all in the yard converged there—and within weeks we had hundreds of toadlets. Then a few green treefrogs found the pool. Next came southern leopard frogs, dragonflies, and all manner of aquatic insects. And then for years nothing new seemed to find the pool—until a couple of months ago when those plunking notes told me we had new arrivals.

I was glad they were there but wondered then and still do, where these bronze frogs, a species pretty firmly tied to vegetated pond and swamp edges, had migrated from. The frogs stayed and vocalized for several weeks and then, seemingly overnight, en masse, they all disappeared.

Now I’m wondering “Where’d they go?” Did they choose a rainy night to migrate elsewhere? Was our puddle visited by an efficient raccoon? Will the bronze frogs return? Time may tell. Maybe.
Continue reading “Backyard Bronze Frogs” …read more
Read more here: King Snake


   Feb 01

Turtle soup, perchance? Prehistoric humans had a penchant for tortoises

By Herp News

Researchers have uncovered evidence of turtle specimens at the 400,000-year-old Qesem Cave site, indicating that early humans enjoyed eating turtles in addition to large game and vegetal material. The research provides direct evidence of the relatively broad diet of early Paleolithic people.

Go to Source

…read more
Read more here: herpetofauna.com


   Feb 01

Turtle soup, perchance? Prehistoric humans had a penchant for tortoises

By Herp News

Researchers have uncovered evidence of turtle specimens at the 400,000-year-old Qesem Cave site, indicating that early humans enjoyed eating turtles in addition to large game and vegetal material. The research provides direct evidence of the relatively broad diet of early Paleolithic people.

Go to Source

…read more
Read more here: herpetofauna.com


   Feb 01

Emerald and gold: Two new precious-eyed endemic tree frog species from Taiwan

By Herp News

Two endemic tree frog species, not recognized by science until now, have been identified in broadleaf forests in the island country of Taiwan. Unlike their siblings from mainland China and Southern Asia, they demonstrate reproductive behavior, characterized with egg-eating tadpole embryos feeding on eggs, while still inside the mother’s womb. What told them apart initially, however, were their gemstone-colored eyes.

Go to Source

…read more
Read more here: herpetofauna.com


   Feb 01

Herp Photo of the Day: Boa

Loving this Dumeril’s basking in the sun for a photoshoot in our Herp Photo of the day, uploaded by kingsnake.com user liljenni brighten your Monday! Be sure to tell them you liked it here!

Upload your own reptile and amphibian photos photos at gallery.kingsnake.com, and you could see them featured here! …read more
Read more here: King Snake


   Jan 29

Herp Photo of the Day: Rattlesnake Friday!

We give all venomous species some love on Rattlesnake Friday, especially these baby Cobras in our Herp Photo of the day, uploaded by kingsnake.com user SouthernHerp !? Be sure to tell them you liked it here!

Upload your own reptile and amphibian photos photos at gallery.kingsnake.com, and you could see them featured here! …read more
Read more here: King Snake


   Jan 28

Satellites show Florida beaches becoming darker, and that’s good for sea turtles

By Herp News

Satellite data on artificial nighttime light in Florida from 1992-2012 was compared to robust data on sea turtle nesting for the same period, showing regulations have cut light levels to the benefit of turtles. Still, adult females are impacted by skyglow as distant as 100 km, researchers found. The research shows the value of satellite data as a conservation tool.

Go to Source

…read more
Read more here: herpetofauna.com


   Jan 28

Herp Photo of the Day: Bearded Dragon

How cute are these two beardies in our Herp Photo of the day, uploaded by kingsnake.com user TazziesMommy !? Be sure to tell them you liked it here!

Upload your own reptile and amphibian photos photos at gallery.kingsnake.com, and you could see them featured here! …read more
Read more here: King Snake


   Jan 28

Greenhouse Frogs


This is the striped phase of the tiny greenhouse frog.
If I concentrate, on almost every warm, humid night, the twitterings and chirpings of greenhouse frogs, Eleutherodactylus planirostris, can be heard in our anuran friendly Alachua County yard. The calls are high pitched, soft, and more reminiscent of the stridulations of some cricket species than of an amphibian. In other words, it might take a dedicated effort to hear and have the tinkling notes you are hearing register as the vocalizations of a frog.

Apparently the first notice of the greenhouse frog, a West Indian species was in 1875 when it was noted in Miami-Dade County. Since then it has spread pretty much throughout the state and has been heard or found in Alabama, Georgia, southern Mississippi, southeastern Louisiana, and eastern Texas, as well. It has also been found in heated greenhouses in more northerly states.

This little reddish-tan to gray with reddish overtones frog is fully grown at from ¾ to 1 ¼ inches snout-vent length. It occurs in 2 pattern forms, a striped and a mottled.

There being no free-swimming tadpole stage this species does not require water to breed. The 6 to 26 eggs are deposited in moist leaf litter, beneath moist ground debris, in the cups or between the leaves of bromeliads, and other places that offer similar protection from predators and drying. Metamorphosis is rapid, with the tiny froglets hatching when conditions are ideal in as little as 13 days after egg deposition.
This little tiny frog eats the tiniest of insects and is not known to compete seriously with any native species. An interloper though they may be, they are always welcomed when we happen upon them.
Continue reading “Greenhouse Frogs” …read more
Read more here: King Snake


   Jan 27

Repeat Offenders


This Smooth Earth Snake, Virginia valeriae, is a repeat offender. For the last several years it has been busted utilizing artificial cover! Most often found hiding beneath logs, leaf litter, or other debris Smooth Earth Snakes are fossorial (live underground) and give live birth to as many as 12-14 live young in the late summer.

A scar, blemish, missing tail tips and eyes can often serve as proof that the same individuals have set up shop and thrive for years under cover at study sites. This is another reason to take time to inspect and photograph even the smaller and most common species at your sites!
…read more
Read more here: King Snake


   Jan 27

Herp Photo of the Day: Frog

There is nothing Common about this frog (Rana temporaria) in our Herp Photo of the day, uploaded by kingsnake.com user kus! See what we did there? Get it? Be sure to tell them you liked it here!

Upload your own reptile and amphibian photos photos at gallery.kingsnake.com, and you could see them featured here! …read more
Read more here: King Snake


   Jan 26

Herp Photo of the Day: Caiman

Gotta love the sassy nature of the Schneider’s smooth-fronted caiman in our Herp Photo of the day, uploaded by kingsnake.com user cpipes! Be sure to tell them you liked it here!

Upload your own reptile and amphibian photos photos at gallery.kingsnake.com, and you could see them featured here! …read more
Read more here: King Snake


   Jan 26

The real Mud Eel


Tiny legs having one toe each identify the one-toed amphiuma.

One minute I was standing upright on the edge of a semi-dried creek’s backwater. Then one more step I was thigh deep in soupy mud and if there hadn’t been a bank edge sapling for me to grab I’d have probably been face down in the goop. Kenny was doubled over with laughter. I didn’t know whether to try and back out or to flounder forward another step. In fact, right then I was wondering exactly why we were here. I had expected mud. Just not so quickly (read that unexpectedly) and not so deep. And I had expected to search for the target beast, a one-toed amphiuma, Amphiuma pholeter, by standing high and dry on the bank and dragging the small meshed net through the goo.

This was a colder than cool Florida day in February, and although it was nothing like a Maine winter day would have been I was uncomfortable, and knew that before I could get back in the car I had to get even more uncomfortable cleansing at least most of the mud off in the colder-than-cool fast moving stream ahead of me. Also, since I had fully intended to stay high and dry I had not brought a change of clothes with me. Well, darn it!

So let’s see now—I was in thigh deep mud that seemed to promise it was even deeper ahead of me, Kenny, dry and fairly warm, was busily scooping through the liquid mud with his net, and I had to get at least partially cleaned off. Stream, here I come.

Although I never did get to net up a one-toed amphiuma (aka mud eel) on that trip, it mattered not. While I was trying to extricate myself Kenny got a couple of the little critters, and pix were possible.
Continue reading “The real Mud Eel” …read more
Read more here: King Snake


   Jan 25

Snake-hunting Secretary Birds use force of five times their body weight to stamp on, kill their prey

By Herp News

Snake-hunting Secretary Birds use the force of five times their body weight to stamp on and kill their prey. Researchers have discovered that Secretary Birds can kick with 195 Newtons, which is equivalent to five times their own body weight, when they attack and kill their prey. And the contact time between the bird’s feet and the snake is delivered extremely quickly — on average just 15 milliseconds.

Go to Source

…read more
Read more here: herpetofauna.com


   Jan 25

Lizards camouflage themselves by choosing rocks that best match the color of their backs

By Herp News

Wild Aegean wall lizards found on Greek islands choose to sit on rocks that better match their individual coloring, new research shows. This improves camouflage and so reduces the risk of being attacked by birds when they sit out in the open, raising the intriguing question of how the lizards know what color they are.

Go to Source

…read more
Read more here: herpetofauna.com


   Jan 25

Lizards camouflage themselves by choosing rocks that best match the color of their backs

By Herp News

Wild Aegean wall lizards found on Greek islands choose to sit on rocks that better match their individual coloring, new research shows. This improves camouflage and so reduces the risk of being attacked by birds when they sit out in the open, raising the intriguing question of how the lizards know what color they are.

Go to Source

…read more
Read more here: herpetofauna.com


   Jan 25

Herp Photo of the Day: Chameleon

We hope the vibrant colors in this gorgeous Panther Chameleon in our Herp Photo of the day, uploaded by kingsnake.com user vinniem1210 brighten your Monday! Be sure to tell them you liked it here!

Upload your own reptile and amphibian photos photos at gallery.kingsnake.com, and you could see them featured here! …read more
Read more here: King Snake


   Jan 24

Attention: Terrapin! Invasive pond slider on the move

By Herp News

Using genetic methods, scientists have discovered that the introduced pond slider is capable of reproducing in Europe even outside of the Mediterranean region. The turtle, originally from North America, poses a significant threat to the native turtle fauna and, according to the authors of the study.

Go to Source

…read more
Read more here: herpetofauna.com


   Jan 24

Attention: Terrapin! Invasive pond slider on the move

By Herp News

Using genetic methods, scientists have discovered that the introduced pond slider is capable of reproducing in Europe even outside of the Mediterranean region. The turtle, originally from North America, poses a significant threat to the native turtle fauna and, according to the authors of the study.

Go to Source

…read more
Read more here: herpetofauna.com


   Jan 23

The lizard of consistency: New iguana species which sticks to its colors found in Chile

By Herp News

During a field trip in the mountains of central Chile, scientists discovered a new endemic iguana species. Noticeably, it was characterized by size and scalation, compared to the rest of the local lizards. However, what initially grabbed the biologists’ attention was its coloration. Not only was it unlike the already described ones, but also appeared surprisingly consistent within the collected individuals, even regardless of their sex.

Go to Source

…read more
Read more here: herpetofauna.com


   Jan 22

Herp Photo of the Day: Rattlesnake Friday!

Happy Rattlesnake Friday with this in situ shot of a Timber in Tennessee in our Herp Photo of the day, uploaded by kingsnake.com user herpermike1 ! Be sure to tell them you liked it here!

Upload your own reptile and amphibian photos photos at gallery.kingsnake.com, and you could see them featured here! …read more
Read more here: King Snake


   Jan 21

Herp Photo of the Day: Yunnan firebelly toad

How impossibly adorable is this Yunnan firebelly toad (Bombina maxima) in our Herp Photo of the day, uploaded by kingsnake.com user HanP ! Be sure to tell them you liked it here!

Upload your own reptile and amphibian photos photos at gallery.kingsnake.com, and you could see them featured here! …read more
Read more here: King Snake


   Jan 21

Buff-striped Keelback


Many buff-striped keelbacks are less colorful than these.
It was back in the 1980s that I made the acquaintance of the natricid (garter, water, and related snakes) species.

Chris had received a shipment from Bangkok, and along with the cobras, kraits, and pipe snakes, was a bag identified only as “keelbacks.” Upon seeing the designation I immediately thought Rhabdophis, a keelback with a virulent toxin. But when Chris opened the bag it contained something very different—a keelback species that I didn’t recognize.

Several of the snakes were similar to each other in body color, being an olive tan (with vaguely bluish interstitial skin) and having a buff colored dorsolateral stripe along each side. The light stripe was indistinguishable on the neck but very apparent on the posterior three quarters of the snake. The heads of these were also olive-tan with black vertical interstitial markings on the upper labials. Most bore broad black bars from lower side to lower side but where the dark bars crossed the light dorsolateral stripes, the latter were markedly lighter. The black barring was most prominent anteriorly, faded posteriorly and was absent from the rear of the body and the tail.

But then there were the odd 3. On these the patterns were the same but the colors differed greatly. On these the head and neck were a rich orange. The scale sutures of the yellow upper labials were black. The ground color was rich olive tan and the dark cross barring was hardly any darker.The light stripes were buff anteriorly but shaded to a rather bright yelliow posteriorly. And trhe interstitial skin of the body was pale but definite blue.

Can you say “pretty?” I sure did, and these 3 snakes were with me for many years, thriving on a diet of ranid frogs.
Strangely, although I have since seen several shipments containing this species, I have never again seen the orange headed form. Beginner’s luck I guess.
Continue reading “Buff-striped Keelback” …read more
Read more here: King Snake


   Jan 20

Herp Photo of the Day: Ball Python

Hope you enjoy the classic Pied Ball Python in our Herp Photo of the day, uploaded by kingsnake.com user js! Be sure to tell them you liked it here!

Upload your own reptile and amphibian photos photos at gallery.kingsnake.com, and you could see them featured here! …read more
Read more here: King Snake


   Jan 19

Frankie Tortoise Tails – Grand Gent of the Greenhouse

Because I can, this morning I walked outside and across the backyard in 30º F. weather, a cup of coffee in hand, so I can check on Frankie snoozing in his warm 72º F greenhouse.

That’s right. Frankie sleeps in his new greenhouse…outside, not in my house but in his new Frankie shelter, even on really cold nights when otherwise I would haul his huge shell into my house to sleep in the bathroom.

Frankie is no longer the King of Cardboard. Frankie can now enjoy the winter in his own outdoor abode, his new greenhouse, in warmth and security.

He no longer snuggles with cardboard. Frankie is nestled shell deep in insulating hay. His Kane Livestock pad attached to his back wall, an oil heater near the front of his cave, and most important, a heated floor that keeps his toes toasty.

Frankie is the now Grand Gent of the Greenhouse.

Since the greenhouse was installed a month ago, the beginning of December, Frankie has only spent two nights inside our house and only because the greenhouse had not proven itself in freezing weather. After a few modifications last week, Frankie’s greenhouse keeps him safe and warm into the 30’s.

The greenhouse solves so many problems. We can now open the guest room to real humans as Frankie no longer lives in the bathroom during the winter. Greg can visit the gecko room with no fear of stepping in Frankie poop. No more mopping up gallons of Frankie pee off floor tile. The bathroom and laundry room don’t smell like a horse barn. Carpet cleaning with our Green Steam Machine is reduced to a couple times a year.

But I miss Frankie. Many days it’s just too cold for Frankie to walk around the yard. He spends many hours tucked up inside his greenhouse. Luckily, the greenhouse is big enough for me to sit in my own chair and enjoy the warmth with him.

So, cup of coffee in hand I head out to visit the Grand Gent of the Greenhouse. The low last night was 30º F, and confident as I am in the greenhouse, I still want to see how Frankie is doing.

Cup of coffee, and a camera in hand. Of course.

Walk gingerly across the lightly frosted grass. Open the greenhouse door and immediately I am greeted with a flush of warmth. I can’t see Frankie because he is deep within his box. An electric oil heater covers the open space into his box.

The temperature gauge on the wall says its 71º F. I grab the heat temperature gun so I can check to see exactly how warm Frankie is. I pull the oil heater back so I can peek at Frankie.

Awe. Frankie is so cute when he is sleeping. Hi, ya, Frankie! Frankie’s shell reads a toasty 74º F,

Frankie peers out at me through …read more
Read more here: Turtle Times


   Jan 19

Frankie Tortoise Tails – Frankie's New Luxury Condo

Under construction…literally the page and Frankie’s house is under construction so check the date posted on the title for new additions…to the post and to Frankie’s house.

To accommodate Frankie’s increasing size and weight we decided to go really, really big with the hopes this may be the last installment of Frankie houses.

Goals: Fit the growing Frankie, handle the brief but cold coast temperatures, have an area that has the comfort and security of a cave, and keep him happier outside all winter long. I wanted Frankie to be “in the light” during the day so he isn’t so miserable during cold spells, and when the temperatures are good Frankie can get outside without help. Our solution is a green house.

We decided on a Sunglo Greenhouse Kit, the Lean-To 5X7X7 (actual 5′ 1.5″ x 7′ 6″ x 7′ &”), priced at just over $2,600 (his last cost just over $1,000 and lasted about five years). This was an investment and, hey, we can grow winter veggies.

The Sunglo included fan, thermostat and shutters. Greg planned customizing the basic model for Frankie.

The one big add on: radiant floor heating. We believe this will make the Frankie shelter a 100% suitable for year round habitation.

I may move in with him. The greenhouse has electricity and WIFI.

Here is the installation

Posted Image

Footings as required by greenhouse specifications. Can’t say much except Greg and I are doing all the work ourselves….mostly Greg. I make the sandwiches.

Posted Image

Once the footings were down and cured it was time to set up and install the radiant floor heat.

Insulation was set on the bare ground.

Posted Image
Insulation is placed in preparation for the 120 volt heating cables.

Greg picked up the parts for the radiant heat floor from a company called WarmlyYours. He assembled everything himself. Greg set the heating cables evenly on a metal grid and attached electrics in preparation for the cement pour.

Posted Image
Grid with the heating cables are set on spacers on the insulation.

Posted Image
Once everything was in place the cement was poured and left to cure.

Posted Image
A week later the cement was cured enough to start the build. Frankie did a test walk to make sure.
Posted Image
Foundation brackets were drilled into the cement.

Drilling into cement was about the hardest part of the whole installation. Picking up the right tools and bits helped but it …read more
Read more here: Turtle Times


   Jan 19

Herp Photo of the Day: Crocodile Lizard

This gorgeous Shinisaurus crocodilurus in our Herp Photo of the day, uploaded by kingsnake.com user lavadusch will hopefully be the brightest part of your day! Be sure to tell them you liked it here!

Upload your own reptile and amphibian photos photos at gallery.kingsnake.com, and you could see them featured here! …read more
Read more here: King Snake


   Jan 19

Rainbow Lizards


This is a subordinate male rainbow lizard from a Miami population.
The northeastern South American country of Colombia was once the predominant shipper of neotropical wildlife to the United States. Birds of all manner (cock-of-the-rocks to parrots), mammals (wooly monkeys to ocelots to anteaters), amphibians (remember the Colombia horned frog?), reptiles (boas to red-footed tortoises, to rainbow lizards).

Rainbow lizards?

So, How Does One Accurately Describe a Rainbow Lizard?

Well, if I chose to try, describing the little 8-striped (the vertebrals strip is divided!) brownish and greenish female would not be awfully difficult. But to describe the blue, yellow, green, brown (and several hues between) of a dominant male could prove to be a chore and would probably wind up being inaccurate anyways. So, to make things easy, allow me to suggest that you determine the origin of the example in question. As it now stands the lizards making up what is currently known as Cnemidophorus lemniscatus are probably a species complex. They will differ in color and pattern at different locales. Color intensity also varies according to the status of the male within a given population. Dominant males are much more colorful than subordinate males.

So have at it. At least you’ll be more satisfied with your description of the example at hand. That’s a certainty! Oh, by the way, the lizards depicted here are from a Miami-Dade County population that probably contains genes from several Colombian origins.

Rainbow lizards, a teiid, are adult at 10-12 inches in total length. Although the primary diet is insects and other invertebrates these lizards also eat seeds, berries, and blossoms.

Continue reading “Rainbow Lizards” …read more
Read more here: King Snake


   Jan 18

Herp Photo of the Day: Gartersnake

As you can see from our Herp Photo of the day, uploaded by kingsnake.com user TomDickinson, garter snakes come in an amazing variety of colors! Be sure to tell them you liked it here!

Upload your own reptile and amphibian photos photos at gallery.kingsnake.com, and you could see them featured here! …read more
Read more here: King Snake


   Jan 15

Brazilian torrent frogs communicate using sophisticated audio, visual signals

By Herp News

Brazilian torrent frogs may use sophisticated audio and visual signals to communicate, including inflating vocal sacs, squealing, and arm waving, according to a new study. The authors suggest their results indicate that Brazilian torrent frogs have one of the most diverse repertoires of visual and audio displays known to frogs, indicating that communication in torrent frog species is likely more sophisticated than previously thought.

Go to Source

…read more
Read more here: herpetofauna.com


   Jan 15

Brazilian torrent frogs communicate using sophisticated audio, visual signals

By Herp News

Brazilian torrent frogs may use sophisticated audio and visual signals to communicate, including inflating vocal sacs, squealing, and arm waving, according to a new study. The authors suggest their results indicate that Brazilian torrent frogs have one of the most diverse repertoires of visual and audio displays known to frogs, indicating that communication in torrent frog species is likely more sophisticated than previously thought.

Go to Source

…read more
Read more here: herpetofauna.com